How to use ancient technology to help fight climate change

How to use ancient technology to help fight climate change

The ancient Egyptians used technology to monitor the climate, including the sun and moon, according to researchers who have discovered evidence of the use of solar energy.

Archaeologists from the University of Oxford have used computer models to calculate the number of times solar energy was used by the Egyptians.

“The ancient Egyptians had a keen eye for how the sun was changing,” Dr David Jones, a specialist in ancient Egyptian science from Oxford, said.

“They were monitoring the sun very closely and used solar-powered instruments to keep track of that.”

This information was then used to determine the day length and the time of day.

“Dr Jones said the discovery, published in Nature Communications, could help scientists to better understand how ancient Egyptians were monitoring climate change.”

Using computer modelling, we were able to work out how many times solar radiation was being absorbed and how long it took to return to the same position,” he said.

The team used satellite data to calculate how often the sun’s light was being reflected by the surface of the planet.”

It turns out that the Egyptians were using a lot of solar radiation to monitor how the climate was changing.

“That information would have been of great use to the Egyptians in predicting how they would react to climate change in the future,” he added.

The scientists used a model to estimate how many solar photons would be absorbed by the earth’s surface at a given time and then converted that into energy using a computer algorithm.

Dr Jones told ABC News the model provided an estimate of how many hours of solar rays were absorbed per day.

“We were able, through that, to calculate where the average rate of solar activity was,” he explained.

The model also showed that the average daily rate of incoming solar radiation varied depending on the latitude of the city, the day and year.

“So if the sun rises in the east at noon, for example, then the solar activity would be higher than the rest of the day,” Dr Jones said.

Dr David Jones from Oxford University, who co-authored the study, said the finding could help us better understand the timing of climate change, which could be an important factor in managing climate change and how it might be managed.

“If you look at the way we manage the climate today, if we are not acting now, then we may not be able to manage future climate change,” Dr Javid said.

Topics:science-and-technology,environment,science-organisations,history,science,climate-change,earth-sciences,egypt,united-statesFirst posted October 23, 2020 16:42:03Contact Amy Smith

admin

Related Posts

How did Ancient Egypt end up on the map?

How did Ancient Egypt end up on the map?

How to Make a Great Game in 5 Days with Ancient Japan

How to Make a Great Game in 5 Days with Ancient Japan

How to read the Greek government’s latest bailout plan

How to read the Greek government’s latest bailout plan

How to get lost in Ancient Greece

How to get lost in Ancient Greece