The Chinese Consulate: The World’s Most Antique Chinese Embassy

The Chinese Consulate: The World’s Most Antique Chinese Embassy

New York magazine has named China’s most antiques-filled consulate the World’s First Antique-Style Chinese Consular Office in Hong Kong.

The World Antique Museum’s new website features a “tour guide” to the embassy’s interior and a slideshow of “unique and fascinating” exhibits, including a large-scale “pandemonium” in which visitors can watch a live video of an “all-night riot.”

The embassy’s mission statement notes, “The mission of the Chinese Consul-General is to ensure the welfare and well-being of China’s people and citizens, and to assist in the administration of the internal affairs of China.”

It also notes that “the consular office is located in the heart of the Chinatown district, where a wide variety of local Chinese culture is enjoyed by locals.”

In its description of the consular offices, the magazine said: The most unique features of the Consulate-General Office include its large hall, which was designed in the 1930s by Chinese architect Liu Wei, the enormous hallways, which were made of stone, and the grand hall, where visitors can enjoy a free tour of the building, which is also the largest in the world.

And, if you want to see the interior of the office, you’ll have to come to the Chinese Cultural Center.

 It’s also worth noting that the office’s “panda cubicle” has the same name as the infamous movie, and that the embassy has had its own pandemic mascot since the 1990s.

The pandemic has also inspired the film, “Pandemonium,” which stars Jason Momoa, Jessica Alba, Samuel L. Jackson, and Amy Adams.

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