Ancient skull found in Armenia leads to speculation of a Jewish ancestor

Ancient skull found in Armenia leads to speculation of a Jewish ancestor

The bones of an ancient skull found on the bank of the Sibyrian River in Armenia have led archaeologists to speculate that the skull belonged to a Jewish man.

The skull was unearthed by an excavator in the early 2000s and has been stored at the Institute of Archaeology of Armenia for some time.

The researchers have said the skull is a member of the early Jewish community.

“It is believed that the people who inhabited the region of modern Armenia from the beginning of time were Jews and they were descendants of the Canaanites, the ancient people of the area,” archaeologist Dr. Huseyin Yerevan said in a statement.

“They were the ancestors of today’s Palestinians, and this is one of the most important discoveries in Armenia’s archaeological history.”

Yerevan and his colleagues discovered the skull in a dig in the village of Yerevaran, which lies between the Armenian and Azerbaijani border, about a year ago.

They have been excavating the village for about three years now.

“We know the site well, and our results were very impressive,” Yerevans team leader and professor at the Armenian National University, Zaur Akhanov, told Rudaw English.

“We found traces of people living in the area, so we had an idea that the area is populated by people who came from around the world.”

The skull, which measures 10 centimeters (3.7 inches) long and 2 centimeters (1 inch) wide, is the oldest skull ever found in modern Armenia, and is one the earliest of the bones unearthed at the site.

The team is currently excavating another skull, and will compare it to the one unearthed at Yerevinan.

The team also unearthed several other bones, including one from a male, that have been dated to between the 1st and 4th centuries B.C.

Yerevinian archaeologists also uncovered a second skull that is 3 meters (10 feet) long, measuring 7.3 centimeters (2.5 inches) wide and weighing 7 kilograms (17 pounds).

“It’s a very important find,” Akhanav said.

“This skull is the one that was excavated from a site that is connected to Yerevskiy, the first Jewish settlement in the region, about two thousand years ago.

This is a very significant discovery that confirms that the population in Armenia was Jewish at this time.”

Yeraly’s team also found a stone knife that is about 4 centimeters (15 inches) in diameter, which was found near the mouth of a cave.

They believe that the stone knife may have been used to stab people, and that it is likely that the knife was made from the bone of a human head.

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