What’s the oldest tattoo in the world?

What’s the oldest tattoo in the world?

The oldest tattoo known to science is thought to be the earliest known ancient tattoo in Greece, according to a new study.

Researchers from University of Chicago’s College of Arts and Sciences studied the ink and found that the oldest known ancient tattoos are thought to date back as far as 2,400 years ago, according the Associated Press.

The oldest known tattoo in history is a 3,500-year-old Greek text on a bone.

It was found on a stone at a tomb in the ancient city of Ugarit in northern Israel.

Researchers say the ancient tattoo was made of two layers, with a layer of the ancient language on top.

The text was written in the script of the Greek language.

The authors say the tattoo was created to commemorate a warrior named Herakles, who fought against a mighty enemy known as the Titans.

The earliest known tattoo known is on a rock in ancient Greece, a study finds.

It is the oldest written language known to scientists, the researchers said.

The tattoo was a combination of Greek and Egyptian characters, the team said.

It’s the earliest written language of any known culture.

Ancient tattoos were created by people using the oldest materials available at the time, such as animal skin and wood, the study said.

This type of tattoo was more likely to have been made by a woman than a man.

The researchers say the most ancient tattoos in the study date back to the early 2,500 years ago.

An ancient Greek text is thought, like a tattoo, to be one of the oldest forms of communication.

It has been interpreted as a message from a deity or to describe an event in ancient history.

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